Newsletter Archive

February 11, 2019

Celebrating Black History Month at CCFM

Fresh & Local:

Celebrating Black History Month at CCFM

February is upon us and while your thoughts might be drifting towards Carnival we must speak to the importance of Black History Month and honor the black farmers and food producers of CCFM, past and present. Almost a century ago, black farmers made up 14% of America’s farmers. Today, they account for less than 2%. Why have we lost so many black farmers? Land exploitation. Land exclusion. Systematic racial discrimination.

Historically, black farmers have been denied rights to access land, resources, and fair markets to sell their products. Ben Burkett of Indian Springs Farmers Association experienced this inequity firsthand. Not too long ago, the Farmers Home Administration (now the Farm Service Administration) used a discriminatory practice within its Supervisory Loan Program that hampered black farmers’ ability to grow crops on time by delaying their access to the funds they needed to get seeds in the ground in the right season. While the loan program has been discontinued due to a class action lawsuit, Mr. Ben says it’s still hard to acquire assistance, especially in the South. This is just one of countless obstacles black farmers have faced throughout recent history, and still face today. Fortunately, there are organizations dedicated to food justice and sovereignty for black farmers and the black community. Southeastern African American Farmers’ Organic Network (SAAFON), which Ben Burkett is a founding member of, and National Black Food & Justice Alliance (NBFJA) are just a couple to name.

We are honored to have four black-owned and operated family farms/businesses at the Crescent City Farmers Market today-- Indian Springs Farmers Association of Petal, Mississippi (featured below); Pickled Nola of New Orleans, Louisiana; William’s Produce of Pointe Coupee Minority Farmers Cooperative from Batchelor, Louisiana; and G&M Goat Farm of Wiggins, Mississippi. Of course, we will always remember the late Johnny Clark, Billy Burkett, and Penn Travis, who passed just last year. CCFM supports black farmers and businesses; use your dollars to do the same at market this month, and every month.

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pick of the week

Picks of the Week:

What’s Good?

Have you tried our app yet? The Crescent City Farmers market app is a great tool to help you plan and budget for your weekly meals. Place an order from favorite vendors like Pickled Nola, and have pickled snacks and tangy toppings for all your meals. Download the app on your Android or Apple device, browse items, and purchase in advance for quick and easy pick up at market. Use our coupon code “FIRSTORDER” for 25% off your first purchase!

Calling all Moms!

We’re excited to share that our Market Mommas Club and Market+ WIC programs are enrolling new participants! Market Mommas Club connects breastfeeding moms who are on Medicaid or WIC with breastfeeding support groups and gives them $80 to spend each month at the market. Market+ is open to WIC recipients (at participating WIC clinics only) who will receive $48 in fruit and vegetable vouchers each month to supplement their families’ monthly WIC food packages. Plus, we have regular recipe demos and giveaways for our participants. Join us at the Uptown market on Tuesday, February 12th to learn how to make “quickles” –quick pickles from our market’s winter produce– and stay tuned for future recipe ideas! Give us a call at 504-861-4485 or send an email to emma@marketumbrella.org if you would like more information.

pick of the week

vendor of the week

Vendor of the Week:

Indian Springs Farmers Association

Indian Springs Farmers Association is a staple vendor at our markets, and you probably recognize them for tables consistently full of quality and affordable produce. Established in 1978 in Petal, Mississippi, there are 32 active members that make up this co-op, a majority of whom are black, and many whose farming legacy goes back generations. The co-op is now made up of many second and third generation members. Members grow a variety of traditional southern produce, including sweet potatoes, greens, shelled peas and beans, watermelon, peanuts, and much, much more. You’ll usually find Terrance Travis at our Uptown, Bywater, Mid-City, and Downtown markets; Ben Burkett at Uptown, Mid-City, and Downtown; and Byron Travis, the co-op’s current president, at Bucktown and Rivertown.

Tuesday’s Green Plate Special:

Paella NOLA

Recognize these guys from our new Friday Bucktown market? Paella NOLA will be heating things up at the GPS tent at the Tuesday market throughout February for… PAELLA! Paella is a traditional rice dish from the Valencia region of Spain. With the freshest New Orleans seafood and other local ingredients, Jacob and his team will bring this dish to life every Tuesday for your brunch, lunch, and dinner needs. Vegetarian? No prob. Paella NOLA is making a special veg pan just for the GPS. Come hungry.

Green Plate Special Vendor

recipe of the week

Recipe of the Week:

Yi Mein

Yi Mein, or Long Life noodles, is a festive Chinese dish that signifies longevity, prosperity and good luck. This dish is the perfect way to celebrate the Lunar New Year which took place last week. Pick-up mushrooms from Screaming Oaks farms at the Mid-City market to compliment this recipe, and get creative by adding chicken, tofu, herbs or extra veggies.

What’s your favorite dish to make after visiting the Crescent City Farmers Market? Share your recipes with us on Instagram or Facebook or even Twitter and it might be featured in our weekly newsletter!

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Market Umbrella

 

Market Umbrella is an independent nonprofit 501(c)(3), based in New Orleans, whose mission is to cultivate the field of public markets for public good. Market Umbrella has operated the Crescent City Farmers Markets (CCFM) since 1995.

Crescent City Farmers Market

 

The Crescent City Farmers Market operates weekly year-round in four New Orleans neighborhoods. The CCFM hosts nearly 80 local small farmers, fishers and food producers, and more than 100,000 shoppers annually.

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