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Good Food Words

While Market Umbrella is known for our farmers markets and fresh food access programs, food systems work touches on many social, economic, and environmental issues. The Good Food Word of the Week seeks to shed some light on these parts of our work and the way we talk - demystifying the jargon.

Co-op
Co-op

A co-operative, or co-op for short, is a type of business that is owned and operated by its members who all benefit from its profits. Within agriculture, farmers may form a co-op by pooling their resources, like land and machinery, to build a more robust business. At our markets, the Indian Springs Farmers Association is a joint venture of 30+ small farms from Mississippi that collaborate in growing and distributing their produce. Their beautiful spread of juicy watermelon, sugarcane, sweet potatoes, beans, and more for sale at market (and the CCFM Box) are the result of the combined efforts of a dedicated group of farmers. Learn more about the Federation of Southern Cooperatives, a prominent cooperative association of black farmers, landowners, and cooperatives in the south, including Indian Springs Farmers Association.

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Umami
Umami

The human tongue is sensitive to five basic tastes: sweet, salty, bitter, sour, and umami. Umami means “pleasant savory taste” in Japanese, and its flavor is often described as meaty or brothy. Experiment with umami flavor in the kitchen by incorporating ingredients like pork, poultry, mushrooms, seaweed, anchovies, or miso. For more inspiration, check out these umami recipes from Bon Appetit.

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Chronic Disease
Chronic Disease

Chronic diseases are long term medical conditions like cancer, diabetes, and hypertension that require ongoing care and often limit daily activities. Six in ten adults in America suffer from at least one chronic disease, which are the leading causes of death and disability in the United States. Chronic diseases are even more prevalent in Communities of Color, especially in the wake of COVID 19. Health differences are often due to economic and social conditions that are more common among African Americans than whites. For example, African American adults are more likely to report they cannot see a doctor because of cost. All Americans should have equal opportunities to pursue a healthy lifestyle. Learn more here.

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Social Determinants of Health
Social Determinants of Health

A person’s health isn’t just determined by his or her genetic code. The physical and social environment plays an important role in shaping the health of individuals and communities. Neighborhoods that have accessible affordable housing, food justice, strong social support networks, and are free of violence and environmental pollutants are all essential to promoting healthier communities. Learn more about how social and environmental conditions impact health.

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Food Apartheid
Food Apartheid

In recent years, anthropologists studying diet and culture, have re-termed food deserts, into Food apartheid. The change in colloquial term has been made to represent that “food deserts” are not desolate, empty neighborhoods, but are neighborhoods that have been deemed to be unworthy of having access to nutritious food. Many like Karen Washington believe that “when we’re talking about these places, there is so much life and vibrancy and potential. Using that word runs the risk of preventing us from seeing all of those things. What I would rather say instead of “food desert” is “food apartheid,” because “food apartheid” looks at the whole food system, along with race, geography, faith, and economics.” Read Karen Washington’s interview with Guernica Magazine to learn more.

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Food desert
Food desert

Food deserts are areas where residents cannot easily access vendors that sell fresh fruits, vegetables, and other whole foods that are essential to a healthy diet and lifestyle. People with low-income and communities of color are most likely to be impacted by food deserts, and research has shown that living in a food desert is a risk factor for the development of diabetes and hypertension, both risk factors in exacerbated symptoms of coronavirus. 29% of Louisiana residents live in an area that has been designated a food desert by the US Department of Agriculture. Market Umbrella combats food deserts in the GNO by “Cultivating the Field of Public Markets for Public Good” through farmers markets (drive-thrus or otherwise), delivery options through community partnerships, and SNAP education.

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Free and Reduced Price Lunch (FRPL)
Free and Reduced Price Lunch (FRPL)

This federal program provides meals at school to students from families whose income is 130-185% of the poverty level. In New Orleans, 82% of students are considered economically disadvantaged, one indicator of which is eligibility for FRPL. One of the major disruptions of coronavirus has been to students’ access to food through school, pushing many to the brink of food insecurity.

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SNAP
SNAP

SNAP which stands for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, formerly known as food stamps, is an anti-hunger program of the federal government that provides on average $1.37 per meal to low-income households. Last year, 1 in 6 Louisiana residents received SNAP benefits, the vast majority (71%) of which were in families with children, many were in families with elderly or disabled members and 38% of recipients are in working families. The full economic impacts of coronavirus remain to be seen but we know there’s record unemployment and a backlog of SNAP applications. CCFM’s Market Match program doubles SNAP purchases up to $20 to increase the purchase power and health and wellness of members of our community.

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Food Safety
Food Safety

Food safety used to mean Good Agricultural Practices (GAPs) and the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA), certifications, and practices which work to limit foodborne illness in growing operations. Now the term has expanded to mean social distancing and PPE as the industry works to also prevent the spread of coronavirus through the food supply chain. While food and food packaging have not been shown to be a source of coronavirus transmission, the entire food chain is evolving to meet the new safety need. For more information, you can review the guidance to growers, consumers and markets that food safety expert Achyut Adhikari with the LSU Ag Center has released.

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Urban Agriculture
Urban Agriculture

Most of us imagine farms as wide open fields in the countryside, but farming can also take place in the middle of cities. Urban agriculture transforms empty lots or even rooftops into viable fields, increasing the accessibility of fresh, healthy produce in cities while educating communities on food production, cutting down on food miles, creating green space and permeable surfaces… the list of benefits goes on and on. CCFM hosts several urban growers such as Grow Dat Youth Farm, VEGGI Farmers Coop, River Queen Greens, Know Dat Grow Dat, Powers Beekeepers and our featured vendor of the week (CCFM box partner and Drive-Thru participant) SPROUT NOLA.

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Sustainability
Sustainability

Our planet exists in a careful ecological balance with a finite number of resources. The goal of sustainable agriculture is to produce sufficient food for current populations without disrupting the ability of future generations to provide for themselves by preserving the balance of natural resources within ecosystems. Learn more about sustainable agriculture and support the Crescent City Farmers Market to create a sustainable future.

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Earth Day
Earth Day

Earth Day is an annual event celebrated around the world on April 22 to demonstrate support for environmental protection. Good food is a practice in sustainability for many reasons. Not only are “food miles” - the distance food travels from source to consumption - reduced when local food is consumed, but small farms tend to require less synthetic fertilizers and pesticides per acre than industrial monoculture farms and tend to grow heirloom and other less common varieties thereby increasing biodiversity. Celebrate Earth Day this week by supporting local farms!

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Food Insecurity
Food Insecurity

The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) defines food insecurity as a lack of consistent access to enough food for a healthy, active lifestyle. Food insecurity often leads to stress, poor nutrition, and an elevated risk of chronic disease. Normally, one in six Louisiana residents struggles with food insecurity, including one in four children, although with increased unemployment and school closures, coronavirus has made this problem much worse. Learn more about the health impacts of poverty and food insecurity.

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Whole food
Whole food

Whole foods are unprocessed fruits, and free from additives. If you’re looking to add more whole foods to your diet, search for things that can go straight from a field to your plate without any steps in between. Options include vegetables, fruits, nuts, and sustainably-sourced meats and fish.

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CSA
CSA

CSA stands for Community Supported Agriculture. There are many ways this can look, but usually, someone purchases a subscription before the harvest season, and then receives a “share”, a pre-packaged assortment of the harvest through the course of the season. In this manner, farmers receive income when they need it to plant, and eaters get a variety of fresh produce directly from the grower. CSAs can aggregate produce from many farms, and while some require a subscription, others do not.

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Public Health

This week’s Good Food Word is Public Health - While doctors treat individual patients, public health focuses on improving the wellbeing of an entire community. This can include promoting healthy lifestyle choices, combating infectious diseases, and developing health systems that make quality care accessible to everyone. Public health also seeks to address social inequalities that impact health, such as poverty, food insecurity, and racial injustice.

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Good Food

Food that is picked when ripe and yields maximum nutritional value, grown locally, which limits carbon emissions as the result of transportation and keeps foods fresh and nutritionally intact, produced by small farms whose methods are in many ways more environmentally sustainable than conventional agriculture, for which the farmer and their employees get paid fairly and can make a decent living, and is affordable and accessible for all eaters. For shorthand, we often define good food as healthy, green, fair and affordable. When you’re shopping at the farmers market, you are supporting good food!

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About Us

Market UmbrellaMarket Umbrella is an independent nonprofit 501(c)(3), based in New Orleans, whose mission is to cultivate the field of public markets for public good. Market Umbrella has operated the Crescent City Farmers Markets (CCFM) since 1995.

Crescent City Farmers MarketThe Crescent City Farmers Market operates weekly year-round in four New Orleans neighborhoods. The CCFM hosts nearly 80 local small farmers, fishers and food producers, and more than 100,000 shoppers annually.